Whilst it is often argued that religions should stay clear of politics, it is also evident that many churches in Zimbabwe do at least vote, and many participate in politics. One religious group that is frequently accused of being politically partisan are the members of the various apostolic sects, who, according to the narrative, are supporters of ZANU-PF.
This all speculative in the absence of knowing anything about voter preferences in relation to religion, and specifically knowing how people voted. This cannot be derived from the information that is available to the public on the elections, but we can know something about political party affiliation and other aspects of political participation using the Afrobarometer data.
Using data from Round 7 (2017) of the Afrobarometer, we examined a number of indicators against religious affiliation. The findings do show that the “vapostori” are indeed politically active generally supporters of ZANU-PF, but also that this group is merely a subset of rural citizens who ‘rationally support this party. Thus, it is not religious affiliation per se that determines political affiliation, but rather another example of the divide between rural and urban Zimbabwe.

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